Morgan Iron Works

Allgemeines

FirmennameMorgan Iron Works
OrtssitzNew York (N.Y.)
StraßeNineth Street
Art des UnternehmensMaschinenfabrik
AnmerkungenBenannt nach Charles Morgan. Ursprungsfirma "T. F. Secor & Co." (s.d.; Zeit der Umfirmierung unbekannt). Bezug zu "L. Morgan & Son" (s.d.) unbekannt. 1850: alleiniger Eigentümer: George W. Quintard. Schon 1846: im gesamten Häuserblock zwischen 9th und 10th Street, Avenue D und East River und der halbe Block auf der Südseite der 9th Street (dort Büros, Zeichensäle usw.). Zu Spitzenzeiten nahmen die Morgan Iron Works zehn Häuserblöcke ein und beschäftigten 1.000 Leute. 1868: George W. Quintard, Proprietor. Gelegen am Fuß der Ninth street, am East River.
QuellenangabenInternet: Immigrant Ship Information; www.maritimeheritage.org/ships [Bishop: History of American manufacturers 3 (1868) 130]




Unternehmensgeschichte

Zeit Ereignis
1838 Die "Morgan Iron Works" nehmen ihren Anfang, als T. F. Secor, Charles Morgan und William H. Caulkin die Firma "T. F. Secor & Company" gründen und acht Parzellen am Fuß der 9th Street, East River mieten, um den Maschinenbau aufzunehmen. Das ist der Beginn der Karriere von Morgan, der späer ein großer Faktor in der Küstenschiffahrt und bei der Eisenbahn sein wird.
11.1841 Das Werk wird teilweise durch Feuer zerstört und bald wieder aufgebaut.
1846 Das das bisherige Werk völlig unzureichend ist und den Bedrüfnissen nicht entspricht, wird der gesamte Block, der durch die Ninth und Tenth Streets, Avenue D und den East River begrenzt wird, erworben und die Fabrik vergrößert.
1850 George W. Quinturd wird Alleineigentümer, und die Firma "T. F. Secor & Company" hört auf zu existieren.




Produkte

Produkt ab Bem. bis Bem. Kommentar
Dampfhämmer         unter der Leitung von Quintard (dieser ab 1850)
schwere Ausrüstungen für Maschinenwerkstätten         unter der Leitung von Quintard (dieser ab 1850)
Schiffsdampfmaschinen 1848 www.maritimeheritage.org/ships 1850 für "North America" (I) Der Seitenraddampfer "North America" wurde von Lawrence & Sneeden gebaut.
Schwimmkrane         unter der Leitung von Quintard (dieser ab 1850)




Firmen-Änderungen, Zusammenschüsse, Teilungen, Beteiligungen


Zeit = 1: Zeitpunkt unbekannt

Zeit Bezug Abfolge andere Firma Kommentar
1 Umbenennung zuvor T. F. Secor & Co. vmtl. vor 1850




Allgemeines

ZEIT1850
THEMAFirmenbeschreibung
TEXTThe Morgan Iron Works began in 1838 when T. F. Secor, Charles Morgan and William H. Caulkin, trading as T. F. Secor & Company leased eight lots at the foot of 9th Street, East River, and organized for engine building. This was early in the career of Morgan who later became so great a factor in coastwise shipping and railroading.

The first engines built were for the steamer Savannah and the steamboat Troy of the Troy Line. The works were destroyed by fire in 1841 and rebuilt, and had grown to such extent by 1846 that the block bounded by 9th Street and 10th Street, Avenue D and East River, was purchased and a half block added on the south side of 9th Street where the offices, draughting rooms, etc., were located. Amongst the large engines built were those for New World, Crescent City and Empire City.

New World's engine was designed by Edward Tothill. The cylinder was 76 inches diameter by 15 feet stroke, turning paddle wheels 45 feet diameter by 12 feet length. The boilers were return flue, 45 lbs. steam pressure with Stevens' cut-off gear. The boilers had fan blasts under grates and consumed 9,000 lbs. of anthracite coal hourly with average of 17 revolutions per minute. When this engine was placed in St. John in 1863 the cylinder was increased to 84 inches diameter.

George W. Quintard became sole proprietor in 1850. Under his direction steam hammers, floating derricks, new docks and heaviest machine shop equipment were installed. Some of the largest river and ocean-going merchant and war vessels were engined by Quintard. Engines for Thomas Powell and Reindeer were built by him and engines for the steamers:

Cylinder Diameter
(Inches) Piston Stroke
(feet)
Golden Aye
Golden Gate
Ocean Queen
Empire City
Golden Rule
Mississippi
California
San Francisco
United States
Fulton
Charles Morgan
Herman Livingston
General Barnes
Brother Jonathan 83
83
90
83
81
81
72
76
60
65
60
60
60
72
12
12
12
9
12
11
11
12
12
11
11
11
11
11

For the Government the Morgan Iron Works built the double turreted monitor Onondaga with four main engines, having cylinders 30 inches diameter by 18 feet stroke, a formidable addition to the ironclad fleet of the Civil War. The list included, too, engines for Ammonosuc, Wachusett, Seminole and Ticonderoya. The sloop-of-war Idaho was powered by the Morgan works and the Italian frigate Re Don Luige De Portugallo, the hull of which was built at the near-by yard of William H. Webb.

At the top of its activity the Morgan Iron Works occupied ten city blocks and employed 1,000 men.
QUELLE[Dayton: Steamboat days (1925) Internet]


ZEIT1868 (1850)
TEXTAre another of the noted Marine Engine Works of New York. They date their origin from 1838, when T. F. Secor, Charles Morgan, and William H. Calkin, trading under the firm-style of T. F. Secor & Company, leased eight lots of ground at that location, and erected buildings suitable for the construction of engines, boilers, and machinery of all kinds. The first marine engines built here were for the steamer Savannah, and the steamboat Troy, of the Troy line. In November, 1841, the Works were partially destroyed by fire, but were soon rebuilt. The business of building engines was prosecuted with such success, that in 1846 the facilities were found to be entirely inadequate to accommodate the increased demand, and the entire block bounded by Ninth and Tenth itreets, Avenue D and the East river, was purchased, and the Works enlarged to their present capacity. They also purchased one half of the block on the southerly side of Ninth street, running from Avenue D to the East river, and erected thereon the present offices, drawing-rooms, etc. Among the first large engines built at these new Works were those for the steamers New World, the Crescent City, and Empire City; and for the pioneer steamers of the United States Mail Steamship Company, the Ohio and Georgia. A highly successful business was prosecuted. From five to seven hundred men were employed until February, 1850, when George W. Quinturd became sole proprietor, and the firm of T. F. Secor & Company ceased to exist. Under his administration, important additions have been made to the mechanical resources of the establishment by the purchase of large and improved planers, lathes, slotting machines, and steam-hammers, one of which is capable of forging sixteen inch shafts. New docks, at which vessels of the largest class can be accommodated, have been built; and a floating derrick, capable of lifting, at one hoist, seventy-five tons, has been erected. The engines in some of the largest of our sea-going merchant and war vessels were built at these Works; and those of two of the fastest boats running on the Hudson river, were designed as well as built here, namely, the Thomas Powell, forty-eight inch cylinder, and eleven feet stroke of piston; and the Reindeer, fifty-six inch cylinder, and twelve feet stroke of piston. Among some of the well-known Ocean steamers running from New York, whose engines were designed and built at these Works, are the Golden Age and Golden Gate, eighty-three inch cylinders and twelve feet stroke of pistons; Ocean Queen, ninety inch cylinder and twelve feet stroke of piston; Empire City, eighty-three inch cylinder and nine feet stroke of piston; Golden Rule, eighty-one inch cylinder and twelve feet stroke of piston; Mississippi, eighty inch cylinder and eleven feet stroke of piston; California, seventy-two inch cylinder and eleven feet stroke of piston; San Francisco, seventy-six inch cylinder and twelve feet stroke of piston; United States, sixty inch cylinder and twelve feet stroke of piston; Fulton, sixty-five inch cylinder and ten feet stroke of piston; Charles Morgan, sixty inch cylinder and eleven feet stroke of piston; Herman Livingslon and General Barnes, sixty inch cylinders and ten feet stroke of pistons; De Soto and Bienville, sixty-five inch cylinders and eleven feet stroke of pistons; Manhattan and Vera Cruz, sixty inch cylinders and eleven feet stroke of pistons; Brother Jonathan, seventy-two inch cylinder and eleven feet stroke of piston. Of vessels for the United States Government, may be mentioned the double-turreted Monitor Onondaga, carrying two fifteen inch Dablgren and two Parrott guns. She has four main engines of thirty inch cylinder and eighteen inch stroke of piston. Her turrets are each .worked by a pair of engines of twelve inch cylinder and twelve inch stroke, besides Blower engines, etc. Both the hull, which is entirely of iron, and the machinery, were designed at these Works, and she has proved a formidable addition to our iron-clad fleet. The list also includes the engines of the sloop-of-war Ammonosuc, consisting of a pair of geared engines of one hundred inch cylinder and forty-eight inch stroke of piston; and those of the Wachuselt and Seminole, fifty inch cylinders and thirty inch stroke of pistons; and of the Ticonderoga, forty-two inch cylinder and thirty inch stroke of piston. At these Works were also built the engines for the sloop-of-war Idaho, consisting of four back-acting engines, thirty inch cylinder and eight feet stroke - twin propellers, of six blades each - which, together with boilers, condenser, and air-pump, are of novel construction and design. The engines of Webb's Italian frigate, the Re Don Luige De Portugallo, eighty-four inches diameter of cylinder, and forty-five inches stroke of piston, were made here; and also those for several Chinese steamers. Besides marine engines, the Morgan Works have constructed some very important Pumping Engines for water-works, the largest being one of sixty inch cylinder and ten feet stroke of piston, capable of discharging fourteen millions of gallons of water in twenty-four hours; and another of forty-four inch cylinder and eight feet stroke of piston, capable of discharging eighteen millions of gallons in the same time. These were for the water-works in the city of Chicago. The Works, consisting of an aggregation of buildings, foundries, and shops, cover an area of ten city blocks, and in them are employed from eight hundred to one thousand workmen. (The Morgan Iron Works began in 1838 when T. F. Secor, Charles Morgan and William H. Caulkin, trading as T. F. Secor & Company leased eight lots at the foot of 9th Street, East River, and organized for engine building. This was early in the career of Morgan who later became so great a factor in coastwise shipping and railroading. The first engines built were for the steamer Savannah and the steamboat Troy of the Troy Line. The works were destroyed by fire in 1841 and rebuilt, and had grown to such extent by 1846 that the block bounded by 9th Street and 10th Street, Avenue D and East River, was purchased and a half block added on the south side of 9th Street where the offices, draughting rooms, etc., were located. Amongst the large engines built were those for New World, Crescent City and Empire City. New World's engine was designed by Edward Tothill. The cylinder was 76 inches diameter by 15 feet stroke, turning paddle wheels 45 feet diameter by 12 feet length. The boilers were return flue, 45 lbs. steam pressure with Stevens' cut-off gear. The boilers had fan blasts under grates and consumed 9,000 lbs. of anthracite coal hourly with average of 17 revolutions per minute. When this engine was placed in St. John in 1863 the cylinder was increased to 84 inches diameter. George W. Quintard became sole proprietor in 1850. Under his direction steam hammers, floating derricks, new docks and heaviest machine shop equipment were installed. Some of the largest river and ocean-going merchant and war vessels were engined by Quintard. Engines for Thomas Powell and Reindeer were built by him and engines for the steamers: Cylinder Diameter (Inches) Piston Stroke (feet) Golden Aye Golden Gate Ocean Queen Empire City Golden Rule Mississippi California San Francisco United States Fulton Charles Morgan Herman Livingston General Barnes Brother Jonathan 83 83 90 83 81 81 72 76 60 65 60 60 60 72 12 12 12 9 12 11 11 12 12 11 11 11 11 11 For the Government the Morgan Iron Works built the double turreted monitor Onondaga with four main engines, having cylinders 30 inches diameter by 18 feet stroke, a formidable addition to the ironclad fleet of the Civil War. The list included, too, engines for Ammonosuc, Wachusett, Seminole and Ticonderoya. The sloop-of-war Idaho was powered by the Morgan works and the Italian frigate Re Don Luige De Portugallo, the hull of which was built at the near-by yard of William H. Webb. At the top of its activity the Morgan Iron Works occupied ten city blocks and employed 1,000 men. )
QUELLE[Bishop: History of American manufacturers 3 (1868) 130] ([Dayton: Steamboat days (1925) Internet])